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ACNM Policy Update - 4/22/2014

1.  ACNM Submits Comments to Federal Trade Commission Regarding Competition in Health Care
2.  Celebrating a Momentous Step in North Carolina
3.  Selected State Legislative Developments from
Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Rhode Island 


 

1.  ACNM Submits Comments to Federal Trade Commission Regarding Competition in Health Care

On April 21, ACNM submitted comments to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in response to a solicitation by the FTC for comment regarding competition in health care. 

The FTC held a workshop in late March to examine this topic.  ACNM national office staff participated in the workshop and had opportunity to discuss with FTC staff the nature of the competitive barriers faced by CNMs/CMs. 

As many of you are aware, the FTC recently issued a policy position examining barriers to practice faced by APRNs.  The Commission is clearly aware of how statutory and regulatory barriers impact the ability of the APRN community to provide care and makes very strong recommendations to state legislators that they be removed or minimized.

In our comments, ACNM focused on non-regulatory barriers, such as the provisions of hospital bylaws, requirements of malpractice insurers or the economic incentives to bill under another provider's number.


2.  Celebrating a Momentous Step in North Carolina

North Carolina’s Joint Legislative Oversight Committee on Health and Human Services unanimously passed the recommendation of the midwifery subcommittee to endorse language that would authorize autonomous CNM practice following a 24 months/2400 hours transition to practice period, which may be overseen by either an MD or CNM. The vote paves the way for legislation to be introduced in either the 2014 or 2015 session. This significant step on the road to independent practice represents years of hard work and dedication by the North Carolina affiliate, and serves as an inspiration to all the midwives who are working diligently for meaningful policy changes in their home states. Congratulations to North Carolina!


3.  Selected State Legislative Developments from Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Missouri, Ohio, Rhode Island

Georgia S.273 requires the Department of Public Health to establish a Maternal Mortality Review Committee. The bill became law on April 16.

Hawaii S.2491 replaces references to advanced practice registered nurse recognition with advanced practice registered nurse licensure to align Hawaii's law with national standards. The purpose of the bill is to eliminate a barrier to licensure in other state boards that question the equivalency of Hawaii advanced practice registered nurse recognition to the standard of advanced practice registered nurse licensure. The bill became eligible for the Governor's consideration on April 10.

Kansas H.2516 allows CNMs to participate in the Health Care Stabilization Fund, which will ensure that all CNMs have access to liability insurance. The bill became law on April 17.

Kentucky H.47 adds advanced practice registered nurse to those who may submit a statement of disability for an accessible parking placard. The bill became law on April 10.

Maine H.881 expands Medicaid coverage for family planning services to adults and adolescents who have incomes less than or equal to 200% of the nonfarm income official poverty line as defined by the federal Office of Management and Budget. The bill became eligible for the Governor's consideration on April 16.
 
Maine H.962 requires the Joint Committee of the Legislature having jurisdiction over insurance and financial services matters to solicit the services of one or more consultants to propose design options for creating a universal system of health care in the state in compliance with the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The bill became eligible for the Governor's consideration on April 16.

Maryland H.27 prohibits the use of a physical restraint on an inmate while the inmate is in labor or during delivery. The bill became law on April 14.

Missouri Medicaid (MO HealthNet) has proposed a new rule stating that early elective deliveries, or deliveries before thirty-nine (39) weeks gestation without a medical indication, shall not be reimbursed. Non-payment includes services billed by the delivering physicians/provider and the delivering institution. The goal of this payment policy is to improve health outcomes for both the mother and child.

Ohio H.315 requires hospital reporting to the Department of Health regarding newborns diagnosed as opioid dependent. The bill became law on April 10.

Rhode Island S.2878 would prohibit a group health plan and a health insurance issuer from discriminating with respect to participation under the plan or coverage against any health care provider who is acting within the scope of that provider's license or certification under applicable state law. The bill was introduced on April 9.

 


Should you have questions about federal issues, please contact Jesse Bushman, ACNM’s Director of Advocacy and Government Affairs at [email protected] or 240-485-1843.    

Should you have questions about state issues, please contact Cara Kinzelman, ACNM’s Manager of State Government Affairs at [email protected] or 240-485-1841.  



Don’t forget to register for the ACNM 59th Annual Meeting & Exposition.  Details are available at the conference website. The deadline for the advance registration discount is May 7. Also, hotel rates will significantly rise as of April 28. So take advantage of ACNM's contracted rate as soon as you're able.

Want to take action or get involved?  Contact ACNM's Government Affairs Committee.

Don't have the time or energy to get involved, but still want to contribute?  Support the Midwives-PAC.



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